How to evaluate the Super Bowl ads

February 8, 2010

Every year, during the day after the Super Bowl, there is a lot of chatter about the best and worst ads that debuted during the big game.  If you haven’t had a chance to catch up on the conversation, or if you somehow missed the game Sunday night, AdAge has all of the spots available for your viewing pleasure.  For me, I personally walked away from the TV with the overwhelming sense of having seen two types of dramatic executions over and over again:  violence and men in their underwear.

Despite these two themes, I did have a few favorite ads, however I won’t go so far to say what ads were ‘good’ or ‘bad’ in terms of their overall effectiveness.  I don’t really see how I could, given that I am not the target customer for every brand or product that advertised during the Super Bowl.  This is why I find the evaluation of the ads that takes place each year to be a little misleading.  Critics comment on and judge the ads based on what they found to be humorous, moving, or interesting.  However, since the ads are ultimately about persuading a target customer to buy or bond with a brand, isn’t it really only the target customer audience that can accurately evaluate the strength of any given ad?

With all of that said, for those of you who are still hungry to understand which ads were ‘good’ and which were ‘bad’ from this year’s Super Bowl, I present you with a few questions that you can use to help you decide for yourself.   Note as a support to my earlier point:  several of the key questions assume an understanding of and identification with the target customer.  Without this perspective and understanding, an evaluation just isn’t complete.

Questions for evaluating advertising:

  1. Is the story of the ad unique or different?
  2. Does the ad capture and keep the target customer’s attention?
  3. Does the story of the ad focus on the brand’s benefit?
  4. Is the ad meaningful to the target customer?
  5. Is the ad in line with the brand’s character?

So go ahead and think about the ads that you saw, for which you are a target customer.  Which ones were the best?

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Top 10 Marketing Reading Recommendations 12/28-1/8

January 10, 2010

In case you’ve had trouble getting unburied from your emails, Google Reader, and other marketing reading from over the holiday, here are my suggestions for recent articles that you should be sure to check out.

  1. Brand Focus Leads to Power and Profits (Brand Strategy Insider).  An interesting and persuasive argument for limiting line extensions under a brand.  The post uses several examples to illustrate that brands that are highly focused have higher profit margins.
  2. Kraft Makes a Bet on At-Home Eating (Ad Age).  For any food marketers, this article is worth skimming to see where Kraft is making its bets for new products in 2010.
  3. Taco Bell Latest QSR To Promote Weight Loss Angle (MediaPost Marketing Daily).  Okay… I couldn’t help myself with this one.  Marketers are abuzz right now about Taco Bell’s latest campaign.  Subsequent articles to this one have shown that Taco Bell is taking a bit of hit with this campaign since it isn’t true to its brand core and character.  If you still aren’t sure what all the fuss is about, take a look.
  4. Is Copernicus or Aristotle Running Your Business (The Marketing Technology Blog).  A short post that has a few questions to ask yourself to make sure you are running a truly customer-centric business or brand.
  5. CSPI Charges Brands With Mislabeling in FDA Report (MediaPost Marketing Daily).  Another article for food marketers highlighting the increased attention and concern around misleading labeling claims.  My prediction: statements/claims on labels are only going to become more restricted.
  6. Tipping the Iceberg (MediaPost OMMA).  Northwestern professor Don Schultz has found that only ‘4 to 5 percent of customers account for a preponderance of a consumer product’s sales.’  Knowing this could have a significant impact on how marketers advertise and target media.
  7. ‘Imperfect’ FreshDirect Gets Close to Consumers (Ad Age).  Interesting interview of the CEO of FreshDirect highlighting that understanding its customers has been the key to FreshDirect’s success.
  8. 6 Tips for Treating Your Customers Like Friends (SmartBlog on Social Media).  Some great tips for activating your customers, using the famed Maker’s Mark Brand Ambassador program as an example.
  9. The Principles of Marketing Can Be Summarized in One Word (Ad Age).  Excellent column that is thought provoking and appropriate for all marketers to read.  You don’t want to skip this one.  I’ve already referenced it in a couple of meetings.
  10. A Campaign Linking Clean Clothes With Stylish Living (NY Times).  This article covers Tide’s new campaign that taps into the insight that ‘clean clothes are a mean to an end — expressing personal style — rather than the end itself.’  The article shows Tide’s focus in emphasizing a higher order benefit, that is more emotionally motivated, to help continue to build its category dominance.  It’s a good example of some strong marketing.